Bonnie the little Hiker

Bonnie loves to go Hiking

Bonnie absolutely loves to go hiking. It’s almost comical to see those little legs going like crazy to keep up with and even get ahead of everyone. When Susan Oropallo takes Bonnie hiking she keeps Bonnie on her leash. Bonnie otherwise wants to run off and explore everything!

Bonnie Oropallo hiking with Susan Oropallo and Charles Oropallo at the Smuggler's Notch, Vermont camp site September 7, 2018. Photo by Charles Oropallo.
Bonnie Oropallo hiking with Susan Oropallo and Charles Oropallo at the Smuggler’s Notch, Vermont camp site September 7, 2018. Photo by Charles Oropallo.

Hiking is an activity that presents one hazard in particular for Bonnie – ticks. Of course, the tick hazard is one for us humans as well! This is a photo of a sign Charles Oropallo saw on a hike with Bonnie. It points out information about adult deer ticks and adult dog ticks.

KNOW YOUR TICKS!!! | Adult Deer Ticks (Enlarged image) | Adult Dog Ticks (Enlarged image) | Male Female Male Female | The Deer Tick transmits Lyme disease in New England. Nymphal ticks, active from about May through July, are mostly responsible for human cases of Lyme disease. Adult ticks, also able to transmit infection, are active October - December and again April - June. | The Actual Size of Deer Ticks | Nymph (1/32"-1/16") May - July | Adult (1/8") April - June Oct. - Dec. | Engorged Female (up to 1/2") | In Maine, dog ticks (actual size shown) do not transmit Lyme disease. They are found April - August in northern New England.
KNOW YOUR TICKS!!!

More info on New England area ticks

In the New England area, deer ticks represent a problem regarding their transmission of Lyme disease. According to the sign, the nymphal ticks are active in our area from about May through July. They are mostly responsible for human contraction of Lyme disease. The adult ticks are also able to transmit infection. They are most active from October through December and in April through June.

In Maine, which is just a little northeast of Peterborough, NH where Bonnie resides, it is said that the dog ticks do not usually transmit Lyme disease. I’m not certain I’d want to take that chance though. The dog ticks in that area abound from about April through August in northern New England. It’s most probably best to check yourself and pets for ticks after every outing.

Protecting Bonnie from ticks

Bonnie is very fortunate to be taking medication each month to make her very unattractive to ticks. When ticks do come in contact with her they usually get off her fairly quickly. We know this because after taking Bonnie out or through he woods it is not uncommon for Charles or Susan to find a tick on themselves right away.